Glacier Bay Air Conditioner Problem

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General Marine Refrigeration Technical Exchange

Glacier Bay Air Conditioner Problem

Postby wsellar » Thu May 17, 2012 3:56 am

I have a Glacier Bay Mark II system installed which has a refrigerator, freezer and air conditioner that run from the same compressor with logic control circuits. The freezer and refrigerator are working correctly and have been running for two years, but the air conditioner does not get very cold and barely works. I suspect the crankcase pressure valve, which is really the only component that is unique to the AC (solenoid is working). The CPR valve is supposed to be adjusted such that the Mark II compressor is running at 41 amps. This was adjusted upon initial installation, but the AC was not used for some time. Tried to use the AC recently and tested the current draw at 35 amps. I attempted to adjust the CPR valve and there was no change in the compressor amp draw over a wide range of adjustment. It seems that the CPR valve is stuck in a position that is limiting the AC.

My question is where do I go from here with diagnostics? Is it likely the CPR or is there anything else that I should be looking at? Is there any way to free up a stuck CPR? Do I need to replace the CPR? If so it looks like Rparts does not carry it. Does anyone know the specs for the correctt CPR if I need to look for it? Any ideas would be welcome.

Thanks
Bill
wsellar
 
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Re: Glacier Bay Air Conditioner Problem

Postby Forum Tech » Thu May 31, 2012 12:31 am

Hi Bill,
Sorry for the delayed response. I was traveling and not able to access the system.

I would first look at the pressures and compare the pressure readings when running the air conditioner to the pressure readings when running the refrigerator or freezer. Pay particular attention to the pressure readings during the first 15 minutes of the refrigerator or freezer cycle compared to the air conditioner pressure readings.

I suspect you may see much lower suction pressure at the compressor when running the air conditioner compared to the refrigerator or freezer. If this is the case I would suspect that you have a clogged Thermostatic Expansion Valve (TXV) on the air conditioner. If it is clogged the pressure readings will be significantly lower on the air conditioner because of the lack of flow through the TXV for the air conditioner. No flow through the TXV results in the suction line pulled into vacuum when compressor is running.

It is also possible that for some reason the TXV has been adjusted to the closed position. Some troubleshooting procedures require the TXV to be closed and perhaps someone closed yours and forgot to adjust it back to an optimal position.

Please post back to let us know what you find.

Thanks
Forum Tech
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Re: Glacier Bay Air Conditioner Problem

Postby wsellar » Wed Oct 15, 2014 10:24 am

Another very delayed response as we were away from the boat for a long time. We are trying again to identify the problem with the AC with some professional help.

Do you know for a fact that there is a TXV in the Arctic air A unit? When I installed it, there was no evidence of such a valve and there was no access port in the case to get at a valve if it exists and the manual does not discuss it.

The unit gets cold at the top, but not the bottom and the AC guy is wondering if the unit is upside down. The original installation manual did not discuss the orientation of the unit.

Thanks for any help.

Bill
wsellar
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 9:42 am


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